Monday, April 29, 2013

Is this the new 'thrifty' Globe and Mail? Ian Hunter, The National Post, and kilts


Can’t find a link to it on The National Post’s website, but what appears to be a 2010 article by Ian Hunter (that appears here) contains large swaths virtually identical to one by the same author in the Globe and Mail today. 

Is that filler behind the pay wall?

National Post 2010:…no one can deny that the kilt is an impressive rig-out…a scenic contribution to social intercourse. On any occasion, however formal, the smartest dress remains the kilt.

Globe and Mail 2013:  No one could deny that the kilt is an impressive rig-out… a scenic contribution to social intercourse. On any occasion, however formal, the smartest dress remains the kilt.…

National Post 2010:  In recent years some Scottish kilt-for-hire companies have imposed a new restriction; specifically, customers are forbidden to (as it is said) “go regimental,” which means following the ancient custom of wearing nothing under the kilt. One kilt-maker has written a clause into their lease agreement requiring that underwear be kept on at all times. Another Edinburgh company requires that the kilt be dry-cleaned prior to its return. Even though all companies dry-clean kilts before they are rented out again, this was not enough; at this company employees objected to handling a returned kilt even for the limited purpose of sending it out to the cleaners.

This new campaign is being fought under the banner of “hygiene,” a favourite rallying call of the nanny state that Scotland has sadly become. One store manager said: “From a personal point of view, I certainly would wear underwear with a hire kilt for my own hygienic reasons and most hire companies do encourage it….”…

Globe and Mail 2013:  In recent years, some Scottish kilt-for-hire companies have taken to imposing restrictions – specifically, customers are forbidden to (as it’s said) “go regimental,” which means following the ancient custom of wearing nothing under the kilt. One kilt-maker has written a clause into the lease agreement requiring that underwear be worn at all times. Another Edinburgh company requires that the kilt be dry cleaned before its return. Even though kilt-rental companies already dry clean their kilts before renting them out again, this was not enough; at this company, some employees apparently objected to handling a returned kilt even for the limited purpose of sending it to the dry cleaners.

The campaign against “going regimental” is fought under the banner of “hygiene,” a favourite rallying cry of the nanny state. One store manager in Scotland said: “From a personal point of view, I certainly would wear underwear with a hire kilt for my own hygienic reasons, and most hire companies do encourage it.” …
National Post 2010:  The kilt originated as 16th-century battle dress. Made of worsted wool, it originally included a cloak draped over the shoulder, as well as the more familiar short (or “walking”) kilt. After the defeat of the Scots fighting for Bonnie Prince Charles at the Battle of Culloden in 1746, and the subsequent pursuit and butchery of highlanders by the savage Duke of Cumberland, the wearing of tartan or kilt was considered a sign of Jacobite sympathy and outlawed. Only gradually, about three decades later, did the hairy knee slowly make its reappearance in the drawing rooms of polite Scottish society.

The tradition of wearing nothing beneath the kilt is also an ancient and honourable one, just the kind that modernists detest. In the First World War, regimental inspections of the Black Watch included walking over a mirror to ensure against cheating; an officer then found with underwear was fined a bottle of port.

Globe and Mail 2013:  The kilt originated as 16th-century battledress. Made of worsted wool, it originally included a cloak draped over the shoulder, as well as the more familiar short (or “walking”) kilt. After the defeat of the Scots fighting for Bonnie Prince Charles at the Battle of Culloden in 1746, and the subsequent pursuit and butchery of Highlanders by a savage Englishman, the Duke of Cumberland, the wearing of tartan or kilt was considered to be a sign of Jacobite sympathy, and it was outlawed. Only gradually, about three decades later, did the hairy knee slowly make its reappearance in the drawing rooms of polite Scottish society.

The tradition of wearing nothing beneath the kilt is also an ancient and honourable one, just the kind that modernists despise. In the First World War, regimental inspections of the Black Watch included walking over a mirror to ensure against cheating; an officer found wearing underwear was fined one bottle of port.
National Post 2010: The tale is told that as one highland regiment marched into a Scottish village, a woman watching from the sidelines turned to her neighbour and inquired: “Tell me, is there anything worn under the kilt?” To which one marching soldier called out: “Nay, lassie, dinna fret — it’s all in good workin’ order”

Globe and Mail 2013:  The tale is told… that, as one Highland regiment marched into a Scottish village, a woman watching from the sidelines turned to her neighbour and sweetly asked: “Tell me, is there anything worn under the kilt?” To which a marching soldier, on overhearing her, called out: “Nay, lassie, dinna fret – it’s all in good workin’ order.”

3 comments:

  1. Great work! Does this count as self-plagiarism, or is this simply the G&M recycling old material? Either way, it makes one wonder: why would anyone pay for this drivel!

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  2. Just read the Globe's Twitter feed for free.

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  3. I agree with anonymous above- you can read anything on twitter. Although I my boyfriend did just upgrade to a new kilt, so I don't mind reading double the news on the subject.

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